In Remembrance ~ Giving God the Glory ~ Part 2

It has always been my belief that the word “remember” is one of the most important words we have in Christendom.  Before there was the written word, men used to pass down from father to son, the history and spiritual dealings of God with man.  This very act of telling the stories over and over required a great deal of remembering or memory.

Why is remembering so important?  Well, without it, we wouldn’t have known about Adam’s experience in the Garden and his walk with God before he was cast out.  Adam was a living witness of God.  He had walked and talked with Him.  God shared with Adam his plan of Salvation and gave him and Eve a choice.

After Adam and Eve were cast out of the Garden, they didn’t forget about their lives with God in the Garden.  In fact, having lived and walked with God in the Garden, they remembered what it was like to live in His presence and they shared their experiences with their descendants.  Remembering these things helped them stay faithful through the consequences of their choice to partake of the fruit.  Being cast out of God’s presence brought with it the pain of the realization of what partaking the fruit ultimately meant: separation from God; but it also gave them hope, because God told them that He had provided a way to have Adam, (and the rest of us,) come Home to Him through His perfect and most righteous Son, Jesus Christ.  Adam taught his descendants the reality of God from his own experiences and that His Son, Jesus Christ, would provide the means for us to return to God, our Father.   This great truth was taught from father to son, down through the generations with the fulfillment of these truths revealed in the “meridian of time” with the birth of the Savior, His life and His eventual atonement and subsequent crucifixion on the cross.  During of the next 2000 years, the story of God the Father and Jesus Christ, was again repeated down through the generations.

Men died proclaiming His name because they remembered.

Here in the 21st century, we continue to carry the banner to remember.

We remember that God proclaimed His Son as the propitiation for Adam’s transgressions all the way down through the generations to this day.

We remember the life of the Son:

His compassion, His teaching, His love for others, His patience, His Grace under pressure, and His magnificent stature of Righteousness.

We remember the death of the Son:

His long suffering with His friends who turned on Him, His patience in suffering, His breathtaking pain in the Garden of Gethsemane, His slow walk under the weight of the cross, His silence as they crowned Him with thorns and mocked Him as King, His endurance as they drove nails through His hands and wrists, and His forgiveness of those who least deserved it.

Yes, we are to remember; having taken His name upon us through baptism, we covenant to ALWAYS remember Him.

He reminded us in Matt 25:40 that:

Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. 

And so, we have covenanted to remember,

~that when we interact with those around us, we are interacting with the Savior

~that we will bear one another’s burdens, that they may be light

~that we will mourn with those that mourn

~that we will comfort those that stand in need of comfort

~that when we are in the service of our fellow man or woman, that we are in the service of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ and God the Father and,

~that we will stand as witnesses of God at all times and in all things, and in all places that ye may be in, even until death, that we may be redeemed of God

This, then, is how we bring glory to God in our daily lives: we remember Him and our covenant with Him through our service to others.  We are his hands.  We are His heart.  We are His servants.

In this act of remembering and doing, we bring glory and honor to God in our daily living.